General Rules of AFL Wheelchair

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Australian rules football played by athletes in wheelchairs, also known as AFL Wheelchair, has a long and rich history. The first recorded game of AFL Wheelchair was played in Adelaide, South Australia in 1971. The game was organized by the South Australian Spinal Injury Association and was played between two teams of spinal cord injury patients.

In the years that followed, the sport grew in popularity and spread to other states in Australia. In 1977, the first national championship was held, and in the 1980s, the sport was officially recognized by the Australian Football League (AFL).

AFL Wheelchair has continued to grow and evolve over the years, and today it is played at the club, state, and national level. The sport is popular among people with a wide range of disabilities, including spinal cord injuries, amputations, and cerebral palsy. It is also played by able-bodied athletes as a way to promote inclusivity and accessibility in sport.

Overall, the history of AFL Wheelchair is one of determination, resilience, and a commitment to making sport accessible to all.

Scoring in AFL Wheelchair

In Australian rules football played by athletes in wheelchairs, also known as AFL Wheelchair, points are scored in the same way as in traditional Australian rules football. Goals are worth six points and are scored when the ball is kicked through the middle two posts of the goal. Behinds are worth one point and are scored when the ball is kicked between any of the other four posts. The team with the most points at the end of the game is declared the winner.

In addition to the traditional scoring system, there are also “super goals” in AFL Wheelchair that are worth 10 points. These are scored when the ball is kicked from outside the 40-meter arc, which is a much longer distance than the standard kick for goal.

There are also other rule variations in AFL Wheelchair that can affect scoring, such as the “last touch out of bounds” rule, which allows a team to score a point if the ball goes out of bounds after being touched by a player from the opposing team.

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Overall, the scoring system in AFL Wheelchair is similar to that of traditional Australian rules football, with some slight variations to account for the unique challenges faced by players in wheelchairs.

Common Terminologies in AFL Wheelchair

Here are some common terms used in Australian rules football played by athletes in wheelchairs, also known as AFL Wheelchair:

  • “Mark” – A mark is awarded to a player who catches the ball after it has been kicked more than 15 meters without being touched by another player. The player is entitled to a free kick from the spot where the mark was taken.
  • “Handball” – A handball is when a player punches the ball with their fist rather than kicking it.
  • “Kick-in” – A kick-in is taken by the team that did not score the last point, and is awarded when the ball goes out of bounds over the sideline.
  • “Behind” – A behind is scored when the ball is kicked between the two outermost posts of the goal, but not through the middle two posts. It is worth one point.
  • “Goal” – A goal is scored when the ball is kicked through the middle two posts of the goal. It is worth six points.
  • “Center bounce” – A center bounce is a way of restarting play after a goal is scored. It involves the umpire bouncing the ball in the center of the field to start play again.
  • “Free kick” – A free kick is awarded to a player who has been fouled by an opponent. The player is allowed to take the kick without interference from the opposing team.
  • “Set shot” – A set shot is a kick at goal that is taken from a stationary position.
  • “Snap shot” – A snap shot is a quick, improvised kick at goal that is taken without taking the time to line up the kick properly.
  • “Wheelchair” – A wheelchair is a device that allows people with mobility impairments to move around independently. In AFL Wheelchair, players use specialized sports wheelchairs to play the game.
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Penalties in AFL Wheelchair

In Australian rules football played by athletes in wheelchairs, also known as AFL Wheelchair, players can be penalized for various infractions of the rules. Some common penalties in AFL Wheelchair include:

  • Free kick: A free kick is awarded to a player who has been fouled by an opponent. The player is allowed to take the kick without interference from the opposing team.
  • 50-meter penalty: A 50-meter penalty is awarded to a player who has been fouled, and allows them to advance the ball 50 meters closer to the opposition’s goal.
  • Penalty kick: A penalty kick is awarded to a player who has been fouled in the act of scoring a goal, and is taken from a set distance in front of goal. It is worth six points if successful.
  • Disposal: A disposal is a term used to describe when a player kicks or handballs the ball to a teammate.
  • Disposal efficiency: Disposal efficiency refers to a player’s ability to successfully kick or handball the ball to a teammate. A player with a high disposal efficiency is able to consistently find a teammate with their disposals.
  • Contested possession: A contested possession is when two or more players from opposing teams are battling for the ball.
  • Uncontested possession: An uncontested possession is when a player has control of the ball without any opposition players trying to take it away from them.

Penalties in AFL Wheelchair are similar to those in traditional Australian rules football, with some slight variations to account for the unique challenges faced by players in wheelchairs.

10 General Rules of AFL Wheelchair

Here are 10 general rules of Australian rules football played by athletes in wheelchairs, also known as AFL Wheelchair:

  1. The game is played on a rectangular field that is the same size as a traditional Australian rules football field.
  2. There are ten players on each team, with four on the field at any given time and six on the bench.
  3. The game consists of two 20-minute halves, with a 10-minute break in between.
  4. Points are scored by kicking the ball through the middle two posts of the goal, worth six points, or between any of the other four posts, worth one point.
  5. A player can score a “super goal” worth 10 points by kicking the ball through the middle two posts from outside the 40-meter arc.
  6. The team with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.
  7. A player can mark the ball (catch it after it has been kicked more than 15 meters without being touched by another player) and take a free kick from the spot where the mark was taken.
  8. The ball can be moved by kicking or handballing it to a teammate.
  9. Players can be tackled, but they must dispose of the ball (kick or handball it) within a certain timeframe or risk being penalized.
  10. The umpire has the final say on all decisions and can award free kicks, 50-meter penalties, and penalty kicks for infractions of the rules.
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Overall, the rules of AFL Wheelchair are similar to those of traditional Australian rules football, with some slight modifications to accommodate the unique challenges faced by players in wheelchairs.

Australian rules football played by athletes in wheelchairs, also known as AFL Wheelchair, is a fast-paced and exciting sport that has a long and rich history.  In 1977, the first national championship was held, and in the 1980s, the sport was officially recognized by the Australian Football League (AFL). Today, AFL Wheelchair is played at the club, state, and national level, and is popular among people with a wide range of disabilities, including spinal cord injuries, amputations, and cerebral palsy. It is also played by able-bodied athletes as a way to promote inclusivity and accessibility in sport.

 

 

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